Therapeutic Exercises

Effect of swimming on clinical functional parameters and serum biomarkers in healthy and osteoarthritic dogs.

Summary:

This study aimed to determine whether swimming could improve function of osteoarthritic joints in canine hip OA.

Conclusion:

Conclusion, swimming over 2-day period, 8 weeks continually, can improve the function of OA joint.

Author & Journal:Nganvongpanit K et al. ISRN Vet Sci 2014

Integration of a physical training program in a weight loss plan for overweight pet dogs.

Summary:

To investigate whether a controlled physical training plan for overweight dogs during a weight loss program would improve cardiorespiratory fitness and better preserve lean body mass, compared with results for dogs undergoing a weight loss program based on caloric restriction alone.

Conclusion:

Conclusion:The controlled exercise plan used with a dietary weight loss program prevented loss of lean body mass in dogs. This finding supports inclusion of controlled physical training for obesity management in dogs.

Author & Journal:Vitger AD, et al. JAVMA 2016

Exercises in canine physical rehabilitation: range of motion of the forelimb during stair and ramp ascent.

Summary:

To evaluate overall joint range of motion of the forelimb in healthy dogs ascending stairs compared with incline slope walking.

Conclusion:

In healthy dogs, ramp and stair ascent consistently had greater range of motion compared to trotting on a flat surface, and ramp ascent had significantly greater range of motion compared to stair ascent (P<0·05). Shoulder flexion and extension, elbow extension and carpal flexion were all significantly greater while ascending the ramp compared to stairs. Shoulder extension on the flat was significantly greater than while ascending stairs.

Author & Journal:Carr JG, et al, J Small Anim Pract 54(8):409-413, 2013

Kinematic analysis of the pelvic limbs of healthy dogs during stair and decline slope walking.

Summary:

To evaluate range of motion (ROM) of the pelvic limb in healthy dogs descending stairs compared with decline slopewalking.

Conclusion:

Stair descent resulted in significantly greater femorotibial flexion and tibiotarsal flexion and extension compared with continuous slope descent. Significantly greater ROM was achieved in the coxofemoral, femorotibial and tibiotarsal joints during stairdescent.

Author & Journal:Millard RP, et al, J Small Anim Pract 51(8):419-422, 2010

Hind limb kinematics during therapeutic exercises in dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

Summary:

To assess joint kinematics in dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints during walking up an incline or down a decline and over low obstacles and to compare findings with data for nonlame dogs.

Conclusion:

Osteoarthritis of the hip joints led to complex changes in the gait of dogs, which involved more joints than the affected hip joint alone. Each exercise had specific effects on joint kinematics that must be considered when planning a rehabilitation program.

Author & Journal:Bockstahler BA, et al, Am J Vet Res. 2012 Sep;73(9):1371-6

Kinematic motion analysis of the joints of the forelimbs and hind limbs of dogs during walking exercise regimens.

Summary:

To assess forelimbs and hind limb joint kinematics in dogs during walking on an inclined slope (uphill), on a declined slope (downhill), or over low obstacles (cavaletti) on a horizontal surface and compare findings with data acquired during unimpeded walkingon a horizontal surface.

Conclusion:

These evidence-based data indicated that each evaluated exercise, except for downhill walking, has a specific therapeutic value in physical therapy for dogs.

Author & Journal:Holler PJ, et al, Am J Vet Res 71(7):734-740, 2010

Kinematic analysis of the hind limb during swimming and walking in healthy dogs and dogs with surgically corrected cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

Summary:

To determine hip, stifle, and tarsal joint ranges of motion (ROM) and angular velocities during swimming and walking in healthy dogs and dogs with surgically corrected cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture.

Conclusion:

Results suggested that following surgical management of a ruptured CCL in dogs, swimming resulted in greater ROM of the stifle and tarsal joints than did walking. This suggests that if ROM is a factor in the rate or extent of return to function in these dogs, then aquatic rehabilitation would likely result in a better overall outcome than walking alone.

Author & Journal:Marsolais GS, et al, J Am Vet Med Assoc 222(6):739-743, 2003

Kinematics of stair ascent in healthy dogs.

Summary:

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the kinematic characteristics of pelvic limb joints in orthopaedically normal dogsduring stair ascent.

Conclusion:

All joints of the pelvic limb undergo a greater joint motion to ascend stairs.

Author & Journal:Durant AM, et al, Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 24(2):99-105, 2011

Incorporation of exercise, using an underwater treadmill, and active client education into a weight management program for obese dogs

Summary:

Physical activity improves outcome of weight loss in obese humans, but limited information exists for dogs. Eight obese dogs (body condition score 5/5), of various breeds and genders, undertook a 3-month weight-loss program which included exercise using lead walks and underwater treadmill exercise. The median number of treadmill exercise sessions per dog was 13 (range: 5 to 17). Median distance walked per session was 0.97 km (range: 0.05 to 2.7 km) (0.6 miles; range: 0.03 to 1.70 miles) and this increased sequentially over the course of the study (P < 0.001). Mean [± standard deviation (s)] percentage of starting weight loss over the 3 mo was 18.9 ± 5.44%, equivalent to a rate of weight loss of 1.5 ± 0.43% per week. Thoracic and abdominal girth also declined significantly during the program (P < 0.0001 for both).

Conclusion:

This study demonstrates the potential benefit of including an organized exercise regimen, utilizing an underwater treadmill, in conventional canine weight management programs.

Author & Journal:Chauvet A, et al, Can Vet J. 2011 May; 52(5): 491–496